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Planted in Miami

Planted in Miami is a podcast about conscious living in the Magic City. Every other week, hosts Alex & Jeanette, speak with locals who are pushing Miami to new heights through their conscious companies, activism, community involvement, and inspiring projects.
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Nov 19, 2018

Our climate is changing and we are witnessing the effects playing out in real time: heatwaves, rising seas, intense hurricanes, wildfires and the melting of glaciers to name just a few.  So when it's your job to track and report the weather, these unnatural occurrences are hard to ignore.  Luckily for us, we have NBC6 Chief Meteorologist John Morales not only preparing us for hurricanes but also the stark reality that is climate change.

John has been fascinated with hurricanes and the weather ever since he was a young boy growing up in Puerto Rico.  After tracking Hurricane David in 1979, which passed just south of the island and ravaged the Dominican Republic, John decided he would pursue a career in meteorology.  Years later as a seasoned and well-respected meteorologist, his beloved island would find itself on a collision course with Hurricane Maria and this time it would not be spared.  Knowing just how serious of a threat this hurricane posed to the people of Puerto Rico, he did a Facebook Live video (now with close to 1 million views) warning them on what they could expect and helping them brace for impact.

John is the longest tenured broadcast meteorologist in South Florida and has been a trusted source for many when it comes to hurricane coverage.  He is also one of the first meteorologists to use his platform to speak about climate change and it’s role in affecting and intensifying our weather.  And considering Miami is ground zero when it comes to climate change, we are lucky to have John championing this cause.

We hope you enjoy the conversation,

Alex and Jeanette

Nov 4, 2018

Think about this for a moment: a child born today can expect oceans to rise one to four feet in their lifetimes; Miami is projected to experience over a foot of sea level rise by the year 2050 and anywhere from 10 to 30 feet by the end of the century.  Add to this that not a single viable solution has been proposed that would keep Miami above water at current sea level rise projections, then the fact that Miami will likely one day be underwater should start to sink in, pun intended.  That is the reality of climate change.  Whether you choose to believe it or not, we're already feeling and seeing its effects and here in Miami where we sit upon porous limestone, the future of our city is at great risk.

That's why filmmakers Jimmy Evans and Jack Edmondson decided to make Urban Paradise, to bring awareness to a topic that effects everyone yet is so misunderstood and downplayed by many.  The film follows Sam Van Leer, the charismatic environmentalist and founder of Urban Paradise Guild (UPG) whose single organizing principle is to fight the causes and effects of climate change in order to protect Miami's future.  Sam has been planting mangroves both at sea level and above it for the past 10 years in order to protect our communities from massive inundations of water and he's very vocal about trying to enact changes and policies that will help mitigate the inevitability of climate change and all its causes.  In Urban Paradise you'll learn more about Sam and why UPG's work is so important and you'll hear from other climate change experts explain sea level rise and how it is and will continue to effect Miami.

For their first feature length film, Jimmy and Jack do not shy away from taking on such a contentious issue that is only now beginning to get more recognition in the public sphere.  We hope Urban Paradise and this conversation will only help in continuing to move this topic to the forefront so we can all be better prepared to face this global crisis.

We hope you enjoy the conversation,

Alex and Jeanette

For behind the scenes show notes, videos, photos and more visit www.plantedinmiami.com

Follow us on IG, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and YouTube @plantedinmiami

Oct 22, 2018

Jeanne Albaugh has spent her life in service to the homeless, but when she fell and broke her back while inside a fast food restaurant, she not only lost her life long dream of becoming a world champion in barrel racing, she became homeless herself.

Once she realized her dream would never materialize, she fell into a deep depression and got addicted to pain killers.  Her husband eventually divorced her and she lost her three children.  Jeanne, who gave so much of herself to the homeless, now found herself living under a bridge.  Even though she attempted suicide several times during this difficult and challenging time, it was a letter from her son that helped her emerge from this darkness and take back control of her life.

Now Jeanne is the founder and CEO of Showering Love which provides mobile showers to the homeless via a converted 42 foot city bus.  Not only do these showers provide a safe and comfortable place for South Florida's homeless to bathe, it also restores dignity and hope to those who are too often forgotten and shunned by society.

We hope you enjoy the conversation,

Alex and Jeanette

Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and YouTube @plantedinmiami

For behind the scenes show notes, photos, videos and more visit www.plantedinmiami.com

 

Oct 8, 2018

"Radical simply means grasping things at the root." - Angela Davis

Meet Ana Samantha, part of the Miami Core-Team of the Dream Defenders.  Founded in 2012 after the murder of Trayvon Martin by a few university students across Florida tired of the systematic over policing and incarceration of poor communities of color, The Dream Defenders was started in order to make powerful change come to Florida.  And change is exactly what Ana was looking for a year and a half ago after working a job in retail that left her unfulfilled.  With a desire to get more involved in her community, Ana volunteered with the Dream Defenders and unlocked her passion for activism.

This year they released the Freedom Papers, a 7 part manifesto outlining their vision for a Florida that is able to serve the everyday needs of its people and that asks our elected representatives to put our safety before corporate profits.

Recently touted as "too radical" by the Republican Governors Association, the Dream Defenders have become a voice for the underserved, marginalized, and disenfranchised and are helping pave the way for a Florida where everyone can have an equal opportunity to live their best life, be who they want to be, and live how they want to live.

#thisistheyear

We hope you enjoy the conversation,

Alex and Jeanette

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest and YouTube @plantedinmiami

For behind the scenes show notes, videos and more visit www.plantedinmiami.com 

Sep 24, 2018

 

Owning a home was once the American dream, but for quite some time now it's been out of reach for many Americans.  The housing crisis further deepened that chasm and here in Miami where wages are lower than other big cities, the issue of affordable housing is all too real and leading Miami towards a homeless boom.

So what's considered affordable?  Paying less than 30% of your income towards your rent or mortgage.  We know, you're probably paying more than that and you're not alone.

As the daughter of a Cuban exile, Annie Lord was always sensitive to the plight of those suffering the harshest economic conditions and in her new role as Executive Director of Miami Homes For All, she brings a wealth of experience fostering stability and mobility for those who are economically disadvantaged.

Through a number of initiatives focusing on affordable housing, youth homelessness and chronic homelessness, Miami Homes For All is advocating for everyone in Miami-Dade County to be able to afford a safe and stable home.

We hope you enjoy the conversation,

Alex and Jeanette

Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and YouTube @plantedinmiami

For behind the scenes photos, show notes and more visit www.plantedinmiami.com

 

 

Sep 10, 2018

Traditionally, decisions about the future of communities are made behind closed doors by a select few in positions of political power, but with more and more local organizations getting involved and demanding a seat at the table, the times are a changing.  Sarah Emmons, and her team at Radical Partners work tirelessly to educate and connect change-makers to accelerate the big ideas that will lead Miami forward and to tackle the issues that are stifling its progress.  

With programs such as their Leadership Lab and Social Entrepreneurship Bootcamp which gives community leaders the tools and resources they need to accomplish their goals, they've also crafted the 100 Great Ideas Campaign which crowdsources big ideas for the cities most pressing problems.  In the past, they've focused on issues such as housing affordability and transit and mobility and in November they will gather ideas for climate resilience and sustainability.  Starting November 12th, everyone in Miami is invited to a 5-day, online conversation to brainstorm solutions on how to build a more resilient and sustainable community.

We invite you to take part in the conversation and learn more about Radical Partner's incredible contributions.

Alex and Jeanette

For behind the scenes photos, show notes and more visit www.plantedinmiami.com

Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and Pinterest @plantedinmiami

Aug 26, 2018

Considering it's been predicted that there'll be more plastic in our oceans than fish by 2050, wouldn't it be nice if there was a store that offered solutions to our dependence on plastic and that could help us reduce our waste?  Well, now there is.

Verde, located in Wynwood, is Miami's first and only sustainable store. Now, instead of buying another plastic container when you run out of a product, you can take that same container to Verde and refill it with an earth-friendly (and in many instances animal-friendly) alternative.  With several refilling stations from detergent to soaps, shampoos, and conditioners to choose from, you are sure to find one of the many household items you use all the time.

Thanks to founders Pam and Marta, Verde is providing a solution to help us all combat plastic and live more consciously. Besides their soap refill stations, you can expect to find spices, oils, food in bulk, local nut milks, kombucha, dog treats, bamboo toothbrushes, and so much more.  With over 250 items and more being added constantly, Verde is challenging the status quo and asking us to rethink the way we shop and interact with our world.

We hope you enjoy the conversation,

Alex and Jeanette

For behind the scenes photos, show notes and more visit www.plantedinmiami.com

Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and YouTube @plantedinmiami

Aug 13, 2018

When Nzingah Oniwosan was just 12 years old, she was diagnosed with a rare brain tumor on her pituitary gland called Prolcatinoma. Unbeknownst to her, this was just the beginning of a series of illnesses that would eventually lead her to see five different physicians on a regular basis over the course of nine years. After being sick and tired of being sick and tired, Nzingah decided to make radical changes in her diet and lifestyle to heal herself.

Today, Nzingah is a holistic health consultant, plant-based chef, interdisciplinary artist and the creator of Yes Baby I Like It Raw, a platform where she uses her skills, knowledge and talents to educate people on how to manage stress levels and take control of their health.  She's also a trailblazer entrepreneur who recently co-founded a co-working space in Port-Au-Prince, Haiti called Impact Hub which works at the "intersection of innovation and society to collaboratively create impact with an entrepreneurial mindset."

Nzingah's life story is one of challenge and triumph and we know you'll be inspired by it.

We hope you enjoy the conversation,

Alex and Jeanette

For behind the scenes photos, show notes and more visit www.plantedinmiami.com

Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and Pinterest @plantedinmiami

Jul 29, 2018

5.25 trillion pieces of plastic reside in our oceans compared to the 400 billion stars in the Milky Way. That means we have 13 times more pieces of plastic in our oceans than stars in our galaxy. This startling fact is the first thing you see when you visit the Debris Free Oceans webpage, a not-for-profit organization established by locals, Caiti and Jeremy Waks. Their long-time love of the water and the growing trash problem inspired them in 2014 to get more involved as well as find a fun and engaging way to educate Miami about the damaging effects of plastic pollution.

Debris Free Oceans focuses on the reductionist approach to motivate people to rethink disposable and single-use consumption by embracing lifestyles with more action and less clutter. To date, they have picked up over 23,000 pounds of plastics and have educated over 4,700 students in Miami-Dade County about plastic pollution and how to live zero-waste lifestyles. 

Through fun events like Keg and Clean where you're rewarded with complimentary beer after cleaning up a neighborhood (as long as you bring your own cup), Debris Free Oceans has inspired a new way of thinking of sustainability.  And to get you started, they've created a zero-waste kit which consists of a reusable aluminum water bottle, reusable bamboo cutlery, and a compact reusable bag which can be purchased on their website.

What You’ll Learn In This Episode:

  • When and why plastics were invented
  • Why plastics never really go away
  • What you can do to reduce your waste/single use plastics
  • How they created Debris Free Oceans
  • What they do to bring awareness to zero waste and plastic pollution in Miami
  • What you need to know about recycling
  • What the city of Miami Beach is doing about single-use plastics and recycling
  • The Florida plastic bag pre-emption law

We hope you enjoy the conversation,

Alex and Jeanette

For behind the scenes photos, show notes and more visit www.plantedinmiami.com.

Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, and Youtube @plantedinmiami

Jul 15, 2018

There are a lot changes occurring in Little Haiti and Abraham Metellus of the Little Haiti Cultural Complex is helping to bridge the gap between community and culture by showcasing programs and events that highlight the Haitian and Afro-Carribean culture. The state of the art facility houses a 300 seat theatre, 2,150 square foot art gallery, outdoor courtyard and a Caribbean Marketplace with local vendors, music, miniature golf, vegan food and more.

When we sat down with Abraham we talked about his rediscovery of his Haitian culture upon moving back from Chicago and how he's been able to use his formal education and experience in his role at the LHCC to facilitate programming.  In addition to spearheading free classes and wellness offerings, Abraham has also organized free tours in traditional Haitian Tap Tap buses to enjoy the sights and sounds of Little Haiti. The Marketplace is a definite must visit on Saturdays with a little something for everyone.

We hope you enjoy the conversation,

Alex and Jeanette

For behind the scenes photos, videos, show notes and more www.plantedinmiami.com

Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and YouTube @plantedinmiami

Jul 2, 2018

Cristina Ivory, the founder of Angry Booch, isn't afraid to experiment, which is why upon finding out about the health benefits of kombucha, she decided she was going to make some for herself. If you've never heard of kombucha, you're not alone.  However, the popularity of this effervescent and fermented drink made from tea is on the rise and Angry Booch is serving up some unique, Miami inspired flavors.

After perfecting her recipes in her parent's garage and working the farmer's market circuit, Cristina opened up Miami's first kombucha tap room in Palmetto Bay where you can enjoy eight different varieties. Using local, seasonal fruit to come up with creative flavors such as Hibiscus Ginger Orange and Lychee Rose, Angry Booch offers some of the tastiest kombucha around. Cristina also has a passion for health, specifically gut health, which has led her to experimenting outside of kombucha to offer seasonal kimchi, pickles, and sauerkraut.  In addition to the tap room, you can find Angry Booch at the Upper East Side Farmers Market and Verde Market.

It was such a pleasure chatting with Cristina in her new tap room and learning all things kombucha.

We hope you enjoy the conversation,

Alex and Jeanette

For behind the scenes show notes, photos, videos and more visit www.plantedinmiami.com

Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and Pinterest @plantedinmiami

Jun 17, 2018

Did you know that scattered throughout the vast landscape of the Everglades, far from the city lights of Miami, vehicles from another time, another era, are quietly resting amongst the mangroves and marshes?  By using satellite imagery and investigating rumors, photographer Matt Stock and the brainchild of Abandoned Vehicles of the Everglades, Charles Kropke, go out into the darkness to explore the interaction of man versus nature by photographing these long forgotten relics of the past.

By using a technique Matt refers to as ‘painting with light,’ he is able to create hyper-realistic nighttime images of vehicles such as Ford Model T’s, Studabakers, RV’s, and even drug smuggling airplanes while uncovering a side of the Everglades most people may not know exists.  And by strictly photographing these cars in the darkness of night and by virtue of conversations like this one, Matt and Charles are dispelling the fears people might have of the Everglades once the sun goes down in this beautiful and highly endangered habitat.

We hope you enjoy the conversation,

Alex and Jeanette

For behind the scenes photos, show notes and more visit www.plantedinmiami.com

Follow us on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Pinterest @plantedinmiami

Jun 4, 2018

Each day, people in the United States throw enough trash away to fill 63,000 garbage trucks.  A good portion of that trash is food, which could eventually be composted into rich soil used to grow more food. If you're not familiar with composting or if it's been something you've been thinking about but haven't acted on, let us introduce you to Fertile Earth and it's Executive Director, Melissa Selem.  Fertile Earth is a non-profit whose mission is to lead the composting movement in Miami through education, research, community building, and supporting healthy soil.

Because of Fertile Earth's efforts, Miami now has two official composting hubs at the Miami Beach Botanical Gardens and Smart Bites To Go as well as a pick up service to various cities in and around Miami. Their vision is for composting to be a thriving and integral component of Miami's food systems, local economy, environmental stewardship and community well-being.

We sat down with Melissa and talked all things composting and discussed some of the common misconceptions that discourage participation.

We hope you enjoy the conversation,

Alex and Jeanette

Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and YouTube @plantedinmiami. Visit www.plantedinmiami.com for behind the scenes photos, videos, show notes and more. 

May 21, 2018

On September 1, 1944, the Miami Police Department hired "The First Five" black police officers (then called patrolmen) in order to bring some level of equality to policing in the black communities.  Considering the overt racism and discrimination of our country at that time, this was a historic moment and these men paved the road for those that would come after them.  By 1950, there was 41 black officers on the force and a police precinct and courtroom was established in which to adjudicate black defendants. The building was unique as there was no other known structure in the nation that was designed, devoted to and operated as a separate station house and municipal court for blacks. Today, the Black Police Precinct & Courthouse Museum in Overtown stands as a reminder of the struggles and accomplishments of black police officers in Miami.

We sat down with Terrance Cribbs-Lorrant, museum Executive Director and retired Police Lieutenant  Archie McKay, who served from 1955 until his retirement in 1980 as a Detective.  Lt. McKay is 92 years young and offers an insightful and invaluable perspective on what it was like to be a police officer before and after the segregation era. Terrance provides a unique perspective in his own right as his mother was a stenographer and because he grew up with police officers always being around him.   This unique experience has shaped how he views the plight of the modern day police officer as well as what it's like to be a black man in an America where confrontations with the police often turn violent and deadly.

This interview is unlike anything we've featured before, tackling difficult and sensitive subjects as well as discussing the museum's role in the community and the current state of policing and police brutality.

We hope you enjoy the conversation,

Alex and Jeanette

For behind the scenes photos, show notes and more visit www.plantedinmiami.com

Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and YouTube @plantedinmiami

May 7, 2018

What do you do when you get your dream job in fashion, have amazing friends, live in one of the most popular cities in America but somehow feel like something is off in your life? This is where Colleen Coughlin found herself a few years back trying to discover what it was about her job that wasn't fulfilling her.  The revelation came during a trash day at work when tons of scraps, samples and more were being thrown away and/or burned. It was the waste and disregard for sustainability that didn't sit well with Colleen.  Shortly after, she quit her job, moved to Miami and created The Full Edit, a zero waste consulting and closet editing brand. Her goal is to make the apparel industry more sustainable by lessening the need to "buy more" by investing in quality, conscious, classic pieces that last and keep excessive fabric out of the waste stream. The Full Edit has upcycled 4,062 pounds of fabric and counting.

Colleen now holds a Professional Certificate in Sustainable Design Entrepreneurship from FIT and is the Eco Fashion Show Coordinator at Debris Free Oceans where she educates on sustainable fashion design. Colleen is a trailblazer in Miami promoting sustainable practices not only in fashion but in life.  We applaud her for spearheading this movement in South Florida that is just beginning to latch on to the collective consciousness here and around the world.

We hope you enjoy the conversation,

Alex and Jeanette

For behind the scenes photos, show notes and more visit www.plantedinmiami.com

Follow us on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Pinterest, and YouTube @plantedinmiami

Apr 23, 2018

Nine years ago, Barry Rabkin discovered a golfball sized lump on his throat while washing his face. The diagnosis was thyroid cancer and the treatment was invasive surgery and radiation. Upon the suggestion of his wife, he began juicing in an effort to help aid his recovery. Not only did Barry feel better and have more energy, but his blood work was showing signs of improvement with levels in the normal range.  It was at this point he knew he had to help as many people as possible by sharing the power of juicing.

However, Barry had no prior food industry experience and his juice recipes where solely focused on nutrition and not taste, a point his partner, Jeff Levine, quickly corrected by bringing his own expertise in the fast casual arena to eventually create Raw Juce. (Yup, there is no "i" in Juce) Today, Raw Juce has nine locations throughout South Florida and offers an array of juices, smoothies, and food such as acai bowls, quinoa salads, raw desserts and more.

Barry is now healthy, motivated and excited to spread the benefits of juicing and eating a plant-based diet to the South Florida community and beyond.

We hope you enjoy the conversation,

Alex and Jeanette

For behind the scenes photos, show notes and more visit www.plantedinmiami.com

Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, and Pinterest @plantedinmiami

Apr 9, 2018

At a very young age, Nicole Mejia learned the importance of health and hard work.  After expressing her grievances to her father of being an overweight kid, he motivated her to start running the very next morning.  Together they bonded through overcoming obstacles and life lessons.  Today, Nicole is the founder of Fit and Thick, a women's empowerment brand that teaches the importance of being healthy, embracing your natural physique and living an authentic life.

Last year, despite risking alienating her legions of followers, Nicole came ‘out’ as being vegan and announced a Plant-Based meal plan as part of her Fit and Thick workout app. To her surprise, it was well received and has helped her company grow to new heights. Fit and Thick now offers a line of apparel, workout gear, special events and more. And her weekly Vibe Tribe Facebook Live sessions helps others embrace the plant-based lifestyle from discussing meal prep to natural products and everything in between. Nicole’s self awareness and authenticity shines through in everything she does and we look forward to following the continuing growth of her brand.

We hope you enjoy the conversation,

Alex and Jeanette

For behind the scenes show notes, photos, videos and more visit www.plantedinmiami.com

Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, and Pinterest @plantedinmiami

Mar 25, 2018

Years ago when P. Scott Cunningham was trying to avoid making eye contact on a New York City subway, he came across Poetry in Motion, an initiative where poems would be featured on the trains instead of advertisements. The poem was called, Hunger, by Billy Collins and it painted a vivid picture of a fox being taken home in a satchel for dinner.  Not having been particularly interested in poetry back then, the poem stood with him years later along with the impact of infusing the written word in the most unlikely places.

Today, Scott is the founder and director of O, Miami whose mission is for every single person in Miami-Dade County to encounter a poem during the month of April. O, Miami also has a publishing imprint, a poets-in-schools residency, and other programs that democratize access to literature and re-think the role of the literary arts in American society.

Scott also recently released his first poetry book titled, Ya Te Veo, named after a mythical tree that eats people. The book focuses on what "we think is hidden, in questioning the gap inside all of us, a gap between what we feel and what we say and do, making space for our many contradictions."

We hope you enjoy the conversation,

Alex and Jeanette

For behind the scenes show notes, photos, videos and more visit www.plantedinmiami.com

Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and Youtube @plantedinmiami

Mar 5, 2018

Growing up on the lively streets of Harlem, New York, Rachelle Salnave found an appreciation for her culture and the arts.  Her inspirations from family members to African American films she saw with powerful role models gave her the desire to create her own works of film; a historical feature documentary on the gentrification of Harlem and the Emmy nominated film about her Haitian identity, La Belle Vie: The Good Life.

Wanting to expose more Haitian & Black filmmakers, she co-created with her partner, Ayiti Images and the Black Lounge Film Series, both of which focus on curated films that celebrate the Black experience.

The Black Lounge Film Series is a monthly film screening featuring different themes in art spaces located in historic Overtown.  In February, the series premiered its first film: Sammy Davis, Jr. - I’ve Gotta Be Me, at the Overtown Performance Arts Center. This month's theme is female filmmakers and will showcase three films: Macho, directed by local filmmaker, Faren Humes, about a twelve-year old and his conservative uncle who is tested after the killing of a transgender woman in rural town of Sanderson, FL., In the Morning by director Nefertitie Nguvu about love and its inevitable change/decline and Chisholm 72: Unbought and Unbossed, about the first African American woman to run for President of the United States.

Rachelle is passionate about sharing her love of film and introducing to the community the many inspiring Black filmmakers to help inspire others.

We hope you enjoy the conversation,

Alex and Jeanette

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For behind the scenes show notes, photos, videos and more visit www.plantedinmiami.com

Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and YouTube @plantedinmiami

Feb 19, 2018

When Australian transplant, Rohan Templeman fell in love and moved across the pond to Miami, he brought his love of farmer's markets and the art of making tempeh with him.  In 2017, after partnering with his father-in-law Dan Jonas, BeCultured Tempeh was born.  Originating in Indonesia, tempeh is a protein source traditionally made from soy.  Describing their methods as part art, part science, this duo has created irresistibly delicious tempeh made from organic beans instead of soy, which they believe makes it a more attractive and sustainable product.

A year of challenges and setbacks almost derailed their hopes of bringing homemade tempeh to Miami, however through perserveance and the passion for feeding people good food, BeCultured Tempeh is now open for business at farmer's markets across Miami and select restaurants/stores.

We hope you enjoy the conversation,

Alex and Jeanette

Feb 5, 2018

Paul Silitsky was working as the CEO of a tech company in 2008 when he woke up one morning believing he had laryngitis.  Although he got his voice back a few days later it started to disappear  again.  As the days went by and his voice didn’t improve, he sought out help to find out what was going on with him.  It took him 18 months of seeing various doctors to find out he had Spasmodic Dysphonia, a rare neurological disorder that affects the voice muscles in the larynx.

Since he couldn’t and didn’t want to speak much during this time, he found himself with a lot of time on his hands.  That’s when he came across a book by Jon Kabat-Zinn called, Wherever You Go There You Are, which introduced him to the power of meditation and the simplicity of being still.  Since then, he’s dedicated himself to cultivating a strong meditation practice and sharing its many benefits with others by opening Innergy Meditation, the first meditation studio created in South Florida.

Located in Miami Beach, Innergy offers classes for beginner meditators as well as seasoned practitioners.  With more and more evidence being found about the benefits of meditation, there’s no better time to discover your practice and Innergy Meditation can help you get started.

We hope you enjoy the conversation,

Alex and Jeanette

For behind the scenes show notes, photos and more visit www.plantedinmiami.com.

Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube @plantedinmiami

Jan 22, 2018

To many residents in Miami, climate change is personal.  To Zelalem Adefris, climate change is her life's work. Building on her passion for public health and environmental activism, Zelalem moved to Miami a few years ago to become the Climate Resilience Program Manager at Catalyst Miami. Zelalem works to educate residents on the local impacts of climate change, connecting climate change to social justice initiatives and implementing programs that strengthen the resilience  of communities.

It's no secret that South Florida is 'ground zero' for rising sea levels and that many scientists predict major flooding and inhabitable communities within this century if drastic measures aren't taken.

Catalyst Miami has created CLEAR Miami (Community Leadership on the Environment, Advocacy, and Resilience) to provide the groundwork to bring about change by recruiting educators, leaders and innovators in their own communities and beyond.

Participants will learn how to advocate for policies and practices that strengthen the resiliency of Miami communities, educate residents on basic climate science, threats and solutions as well as expose and challenge how poverty and discrimination make communities vulnerable to climate change.  This free leadership training starts on Wednesday, Feb. 7 and runs 11 weeks.

We're excited to be participating in the training and hope you will join us.

We hope you enjoy the conversation,

Alex & Jeanette

Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and Pinterest @plantedinmiami

For behind the scenes show notes, photos, videos and more visit www.plantedinmiami.com

Jan 8, 2018
When Kathie Klarreich decided to end her decade long career of being a journalist in Haiti, she wanted to dedicate her time to focus on social change by expanding arts programs in prisons. In 2014, Kathie founded Exchange for Change, a program which facilitates anonymous writing exchanges between classrooms in correctional and court-mandated facilities, and classrooms in high schools and universities.
 
Exchange for Change’s mission is to teach writing in prisons, foster leadership, and promote dialogue across social and institutional barriers. They focus on collaborations that nurture empathy and advocacy and create individual and social change.
 
The inmates or “inside students” who participate in the program commit to attend class for about two hours every week and the program runs roughly eight to twelve weeks. Courses include memoir writing, poetry, songwriting, trauma writing and more.
 
Exchange for Change has grown to offer 23 courses in multiple institutions, award more than 400 diplomas for course completion, and feature exhibits of the students’ work. In addition, several of their inside students have won awards and their writing has even been published.
 
Kathie and her team of dedicated volunteers are stalwart supporters and advocates of the program and we are lucky to have her as part of the fabric of our community.

Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Pinterest @plantedinmiami

For behind the scenes show notes, photos, videos and more visit www.plantedinmiami.com

Dec 18, 2017

Did you know? The amount of paper and plastic cups, forks, and spoons disposed of annually could wrap the equator 300 times! 

Spending summers in a country house on the border of Russia and Finland, Anastasia Mikhalochkina (Anna) grew to appreciate the outdoors and witnessed a direct correlation between the consequences of her actions and its effect on a contained environment. Fast forward to Anastasia taking these lessons and her trainings in product and graphic design to found the local start-up company, Lean Orb which specializes in providing plant-based food service packaging and catering supplies made from agricultural by-products such as fallen palm leaves, sugar cane, and wheat straw.

Anna's entrepreneurial spirit and passion stems from her desire to find sustainable solutions to current environmental issues.  She believes in educating not only the consumer but the buyers as well by guiding them through the process of swapping out traditional forms of packaging to an alternative that is not only stylish and custom, but one that can be composted and kept out of landfills.  Her activism also includes  supporting vendors that treat their employees with respect and offer advancements via education such as the Crescent Educational Society (CREDSO).

Building on her approach of community outreach and engaging local politicians and like-minded organizations, Anna looks forward to finding solutions to eliminating waste and creating more opportunities for composting in Miami.  We expect big things from Lean Orb and Anna and we are excited for you to get to know her better.

We hope you enjoy the conversation,

Alex & Jeanette

For behind the scenes photos, show notes and more visit www.plantedinmiami.com

Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube @plantedinmiami

 

Dec 4, 2017

Inspiration is all around us.  For Mariana Cortez, it was her baby boy, Luke, who was allergic to dairy that inspired her to create dairy/gluten-free, vegan cakes that he could enjoy on his birthdays.  When she got the idea of taking her cakes and making them into mini cupcakes, it set her on a remarkable journey which led her to open Miami's first vegan bakery, Bunnie Cakes, and Miami's first vegan DIY cupcake/cake decorating studio, Bunnie Cakes Studio, to selling her creations at Whole Foods Markets and now being the first vegan cupcake to be offered in Starbucks locations throughout South Florida.

Bunnie Cakes is more than a bakery, it's an experience. When you first walk through the doors you are greeted by an explosion of colors and a display of cupcakes, cookies, brownies, sandwiches, and more that are just as bright and lively.  The walls recount its humble beginnings and hearts are a central theme throughout the store and on the cupcakes.  The love for her family is reflected in photos and you can immediately feel the warmth and sense of belonging when you're there. 

Bunnie Cakes is a story of love, loss, dreams, and having the courage to follow your heart.

We hope you enjoy the conversation,

Alex and Jeanette

Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and Pinterest @plantedinmiami.

For behind the scenes photos, videos, show notes and more visit www.plantedinmiami.com

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